Diamonds in the Ruff

Why We Don't Have Play Time

Should your puppy have dog friends?  Of course!

Yes, it is important for your puppy to learn to "speak dog" and have dog friends.  It's as much fun to watch your puppy romp and chase with his own kind as it is for him.  BUT ...

We live in a day and age of dog parks and day cares.  People see every dog on the street as a potential social event for their dog.  You hear them calling "it's okay, he's friendly!" as their dog barrels toward you.  Their dogs do not come when called, they don't follow normal canine social etiquette.  Their owners are not good neighbors.  Dog fights and injuries result.

 

We need to talk about the fall-out of too much of a good thing.  We are seeing a greater problem in recent years of over-stimulated dogs who lose their minds at the sight of another dog. These dogs become frustrated, they bark, they lunge, and far too many have no use for their owners if another dog is on the horizon.

Your dog is attending classes to learn to mind his manners.

Dragging on a tight leash toward a playmate, getting all worked up before they even get there, and then engaging in high arousal play until you get the leash on and drag them home again is a recipe for disaster.  You are teaching your dog to pull on leash, to have no impulse control, to value getting AWAY from you.  You are making all the things you complain about worse.  He won't come, you can't catch him, he is looking for fun that isn't you.  And he can't wait to escape you to get to them.  Is that the relationship you want?

We teach owners to NOT allow their dog to meet everyone and everything ... it's the exception, not the rule.   And always, release to go play is in return for calm, mannerly behavior.  We talk about how dogs can get hyper-focused on people or dogs and this ends up not working out well for anyone. We practice attention and basic skills in class. 

We also teach our owners how to say NO to strangers, which is the hardest part. We encourage them to practice with us pretending to be obnoxious dog lovers so that they get the muscle memory to do it in real time. Holding the hand up in a stop gesture can be quite effective, and strangers will often understand if you tell them you are working on ignoring distractions. Owners need the words because they can get tongue-tied.

There is something about the social contract that makes it hard for some owners to put the needs of the dog over the needs of the stranger. We try to help them get past that.

When they do greet, owners practice calling their dogs out of the interaction and then letting them choose to go back ... or not.

And if the puppy says “no thanks, I’m done” ... they must honor that choice.

And we stress that the pup chooses to go greet the stranger ... the stranger can’t walk right up to the dog (so we know that the pup actually wants to greet).

We do treat for sits and other appropriate behavior during greetings, especially when they call away from the interaction successfully.

We also teach them to just go out and watch the world with their pup, no interactions expected (except fun with the owner).

“If everything else is more exciting than you, how much fun is that?” seems to hit home with many.